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Difference between revisions of "State of the Lab 1998"

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The webserver for the year of 1998 was an Indy DevStation with a MIPS R4400 180 Mhz processor, 1 GB of disk space, 128 MB of RAM, and a nice big 20" monitor. This is measly compared to current standards, but was a good machine for the day.
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The webserver for the year of 1998 was an Indy DevStation with a MIPS R4400 180 Mhz processor, 1 GB of disk space, 128 MB of RAM, and a nice big 20" monitor. This is measly compared to current standards, but was a good machine for the day.<ref>[http://web.archive.org/web/19980707043323/www.tjhsst.edu/WebServer.html TJ Webserver, June 1 1998]. 2 October 2010.</ref>
  
 
The main machine room houses a number of file servers including a 200 Mhz Pentium Pro with 12 Gigabytes of disk space, several SPARCserver 390s and SUN 3/280s, an ETA10-P supercomputer, and the primary network center including hubs, routers, and two Internet connections.
 
The main machine room houses a number of file servers including a 200 Mhz Pentium Pro with 12 Gigabytes of disk space, several SPARCserver 390s and SUN 3/280s, an ETA10-P supercomputer, and the primary network center including hubs, routers, and two Internet connections.
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One classroom area dedicated to high end graphics programming contains six Silicon Graphics INDY workstations with individual cam-corders, an IBM RS/6000 with several X-stations, and a few miscellaneous systems. Licensed software products include the IRIS Development package including 3-D graphics libraries for OpenGL, mathematics packages such as Maple V, and graphics software such as Adobe Photoshop. Most of these computers have 20 or 21-inch color monitors.  
 
One classroom area dedicated to high end graphics programming contains six Silicon Graphics INDY workstations with individual cam-corders, an IBM RS/6000 with several X-stations, and a few miscellaneous systems. Licensed software products include the IRIS Development package including 3-D graphics libraries for OpenGL, mathematics packages such as Maple V, and graphics software such as Adobe Photoshop. Most of these computers have 20 or 21-inch color monitors.  
  
A second classroom area has approximately thirty HP Vectra or Gateway 2000 Pentium systems running Linux with X-Windows. Most of these computers have 17-inch color monitors. Although primarily used in a UNIX environment, most of these computers can also boot to Windows 95. We are grateful to a group of caring alumni of our CS Lab who now work at Microsoft for their generous product donations of Microsoft Office 95 Professional and Visual C++ which we use on these systems.
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A second classroom area has approximately thirty HP Vectra or Gateway 2000 Pentium systems running Linux with X-Windows. Most of these computers have 17-inch color monitors. Although primarily used in a UNIX environment, most of these computers can also boot to Windows 95. We are grateful to a group of caring alumni of our CS Lab who now work at Microsoft for their generous product donations of Microsoft Office 95 Professional and Visual C++ which we use on these systems.<ref name="1998CSL">[http://web.archive.org/web/19980707014910/www.tjhsst.edu/TechLabs/CS/ Computer Systems Lab Website, 7 July 1998]. 2 October 2010.</ref>
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
*http://oldsite.tjhsst.edu/WebServer.html
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{{reflist}}

Revision as of 23:15, 2 October 2010

The webserver for the year of 1998 was an Indy DevStation with a MIPS R4400 180 Mhz processor, 1 GB of disk space, 128 MB of RAM, and a nice big 20" monitor. This is measly compared to current standards, but was a good machine for the day.[1]

The main machine room houses a number of file servers including a 200 Mhz Pentium Pro with 12 Gigabytes of disk space, several SPARCserver 390s and SUN 3/280s, an ETA10-P supercomputer, and the primary network center including hubs, routers, and two Internet connections.

One classroom area dedicated to high end graphics programming contains six Silicon Graphics INDY workstations with individual cam-corders, an IBM RS/6000 with several X-stations, and a few miscellaneous systems. Licensed software products include the IRIS Development package including 3-D graphics libraries for OpenGL, mathematics packages such as Maple V, and graphics software such as Adobe Photoshop. Most of these computers have 20 or 21-inch color monitors.

A second classroom area has approximately thirty HP Vectra or Gateway 2000 Pentium systems running Linux with X-Windows. Most of these computers have 17-inch color monitors. Although primarily used in a UNIX environment, most of these computers can also boot to Windows 95. We are grateful to a group of caring alumni of our CS Lab who now work at Microsoft for their generous product donations of Microsoft Office 95 Professional and Visual C++ which we use on these systems.[2]

References